Data Description

This page summarizes information about the selected resource and its origin based on SPASE metadata.

Table of Contents

  1. Instrument
  2. Observatory
  3. Persons

SPASE version 2.0.0

Instrument: Langmuir Probe Instrument

Instrument ID
spase://SMWG/Instrument/CRRES/LPI Get XML
Name
Langmuir Probe Instrument
Description

The Langmuir probe was designed to measure the temperature and density of cold electrons and the electric fields in the magnetosphere, as well as their spatial and temporal fluctuations. The purpose was to better understand the wave-particle interactions. The probe instrument consisted of two pairs of orthogonal booms with tip-to-tip separations of 100 m. They were located in the spin plane of the satellite. One pair of booms carried spherical sensors and the other cylindrical antennas. An onboard microprocessor controlled the operating mode. In the Langmuir probe mode the spherical sensors were biased at fixed potentials relative to the ambient plasma and the currents collected by the sensors provided the temperature and the density of the plasma electrons. In the electric field mode both pairs of sensors were current-biased and monitored the electric field. The energy range of the measured ambient plasma was up to 10 eV and the frequency range of the measured electric field was from dc to 1 kHz. This experiment was part of the SPACERAD project sponsored by AFGL.

Additional information
NSSDC's Master Catalog

Information about the Langmuir Probe Instrument experiment on the CRRES mission.

Contact
Role Person
1. Principal investigator Prof. Forrest S. Mozer Get XML
2. Principal investigator Dr. E. Gary Mullen Get XML
Release date
2009-05-20 21:10:11
Instrument type
Langmuir Probe
Investigation name
Langmuir Probe Instrument on CRRES
Observatory
CRRES Get XML

SPASE version 2.2.0

Observatory: CRRES

Observatory ID
spase://SMWG/Observatory/CRRES Get XML
Name
CRRES
Alternate name
1990-065A
Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite
Description

The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) was launched into a geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO) for a nominal three-year mission to investigate fields, plasmas, and energetic particles inside the Earth's magnetosphere. As part of the CRRES program the SPACERAD (Space Radiation Effects) project, managed by Air Force Geophysics Laboratory, investigated the radiation environment of the inner and outer radiation belts and measured radiation effects on state-of-the-art microelectronics devices. Other magnetospheric, ionospheric, and cosmic ray experiments were included onboard CRRES and supported by NASA or the Office of Naval Research. The chemical release project was managed by NASA/MSFC and utilized the release of chemicals from onboard cannisters at low altitudes near dawn and dusk perigee times and at high altitudes near local midnight. The chemical releases were monitored with optical and radar instrumentation by ground-based observers to measure the bulk properties and movement of the expanding clouds of photo-ionized plasma along field lines after the releases occurred. In order to study the magnetosphere at different local times during the mission, the satellite orbit was designed to precess with respect to the earth-sun line such that the local time at apogee decreased by 2.5 minutes/day from 08:00 (LT) just after launch and returned to this position in nineteen-month cycles. The CRRES spacecraft had the shape of an octagonal prism with solar arrays on the top side. The prism is 1 m high and 3 m between opposite faces. Four of the eight compartments were for the chemical canisters and the other four housed SPACERAD and other experiments. The spacecraft body was spun at 2.2 rpm about a spin axis in the ecliptic plane and kept pointed about 12 degrees ahead of the Sun's apparent motion in celestial coordinates. Pre-launch and in-flight operations were supported by the Space Test and Transportation Program Office of the U.S. Air Force Space Division. Contact with the CRRES spacecraft was lost on October 12, 1991 and was presumed to be due to onboard battery failure.

Additional information
NSSDC's Master Catalog

Information about the CRRES mission

Contact
Role Person
1. Project scientist Dr. Susan Gussenhoven-Shea Get XML
2. Project scientist Dr. David L. Reasoner Get XML
Release date
2010-08-05 18:19:16
Location
Region
Earth.Magnetosphere.Main

SPASE version 2.2.0

Person: Prof. Forrest S. Mozer

Name
Prof. Forrest S. Mozer
Organization
University of California, Berkeley
Address
Room 306 Space Science Laboratory University of California, Berkeley Berkeley CA 94720
Email
mozer@sunspot.ssl.berkeley.edu
Phone
+1-510-642-0549
Person ID
spase://SMWG/Person/Forrest.S.Mozer Get XML
Release date
2010-08-05 17:35:46

SPASE version 2.2.0

Person: Dr. E. Gary Mullen

Name
Dr. E. Gary Mullen
Organization
USAF Geophysics Laboratory
Person ID
spase://SMWG/Person/E.Gary.Mullen Get XML

SPASE version 2.2.0

Person: Dr. Susan Gussenhoven-Shea

Name
Dr. Susan Gussenhoven-Shea
Organization
USAF Geophysics Laboratory
Phone
+1-781-377-3212
Person ID
spase://SMWG/Person/Susan.Gussenhoven-Shea Get XML
Release date
2010-08-05 17:35:47

SPASE version 2.2.0

Person: Dr. David L. Reasoner

Name
Dr. David L. Reasoner
Organization
Deceased - formerly at NASA-MSFC
Person ID
spase://SMWG/Person/David.L.Reasoner Get XML
Release date
2010-08-05 17:35:46